Recent Fire Damage Posts

Fire Safety and Your Pets

3/13/2019 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Safety and Your Pets Keep Me Safe!

Emergencies can happen at any moment and can come in a myriad of ways. While we may never be able to fully prevent such events from happening, we can prepare ourselves and our pets for when they do. Use this list to ensure that you and your furry friends are prepared should a fire break out. 

  • Consider installing monitored smoke detectors. If you live in a fire-prone area or are concerned about a fire potentially starting, monitored smoke detectors are always a smart choice. Should a fire start, firefighters will be notified and can respond, even if you’re not home.
  • Note where your pets like to nap or hide. This is important in the event that you must evacuate your home quickly. Remember that pets can be exponentially more difficult to round up if they sense stress—especially cats! Practice crating your pets in advance to make it a positive experience so they don’t go running when you pull out their crate during any type of emergency. 
  • Have an emergency plan, and practice escape routes with your pet. Include all members of the family in this plan, and make sure they know what to do and where to go.
  • Keep the phone number and address of a local animal hospital handy. If your pet is injured, you’ll need to know where to take them for treatment quickly.
  • Pet-proof your home. Ensure there are no areas where pets can start fires accidentally (including stove knobs, loose wires, candles, fireplaces and other potential hazards). Never leave a pet unattended with a lit candle or fireplace. 
  • Get a rescue alert sticker. This easy-to-use sticker will let people know that pets are inside your home. Make sure it is visible to rescue workers (we recommend placing it on or near your front door), and that it includes the types and number of pets in your home, as well as the name and number of your veterinarian. If you must evacuate with your pets, and if time allows, write “EVACUATED” across the stickers. 
  • If you evacuate, take your pets with you whenever possible. If you leave them behind, they may become trapped or escape and be exposed to numerous life-threatening hazards. Note that not all shelters accept pets, so it is imperative that you have determined where you will bring your pets ahead of time:
    • Contact your veterinarian for a list of preferred boarding kennels and facilities.
    • Ask your local animal shelter if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets.
    • Identify hotels or motels that accept pets.
    • Ask friends and relatives in your area if they would be willing to take in your pet.
  • Prepare emergency supplies and traveling kits. If you must evacuate your home in a crisis, plan for the worst-case scenario. Even if you think you may be gone for only a day, assume that you may not be allowed to return for several weeks. To minimize evacuation time, take these simple steps:
    • Make sure all pets wear collars and tags with up-to-date identification information at all times. Your pet’s ID tag should contain their name, your telephone number and any urgent medical needs. Be sure to also write your pet’s name, your name and contact information on your pet’s carrier.
    • The ASPCA recommends microchipping your pet as a more permanent form of identification. A microchip is implanted under the skin in the animal’s shoulder area, and can be read by a scanner at most animal shelters.
    • Store an emergency kit and leashes as close to an exit as possible. Make sure that everyone in the family knows where the kit is, and that it is clearly labeled and easy to carry. 

The 5 Benefits Of A Home Fire Alarm System

3/11/2019 (Permalink)

Fire Damage The 5 Benefits Of A  Home Fire Alarm System Fire Alarms Save Lives
The earlier a fire is detected, the faster it will be that firefighters will respond. This can mean you may avoid major damage or even worse, the complete destruction of the home.

AVOID SMOKE INHALATION

The most important reason is perhaps the only one you really need. This can save the life of anyone in the house at the time. This is particularly crucial at night time. Anyone who is sleeping may not be awakened in time if a fire starts. Many times people die of smoke inhalation while trying to escape. Having a system in place can give you peace of mind and security.

EARLY DETECTION

The earlier a fire is detected, the faster it will be that firefighters will respond. This can mean you may avoid major damage or even worse, the complete destruction of the home.

INSURANCE DISCOUNTS

This can save you money on your house insurance. Homeowner policies often give discounts to customers who have these systems. That is because it can be possible to save a home rather than lose it entirely. In addition, it demonstrates to the insurer that the homeowner is taking responsibility and is prepared in case an unfortunate incident should occur.

24/7 MONITORING

A home fire alarm system gives the homeowner protection 24 hours a day, every day of the week. You home will be monitored when you are away, and at night when you are sleeping. You and your family can feel secure knowing this monitoring never stops.

EASY & AFFORDABLE

Having a system is very reasonably priced. Even if you have insurance that can replace any lost items, many of them are irreplaceable. This would include photo albums, gifts from family members or items passed down from one generation to the next. You also would be severely inconvenienced by having to live elsewhere for at least some time. Finally, there is the emotional trauma of losing your home and possessions.

Facing Fire or Smoke Damage?

2/27/2019 (Permalink)

When disaster strikes, severe fire damage can be the most devastating thing to happen to any property. As fire becomes an increasingly prevalent threat, insurance companies are constantly trying to cut corners on fire insurance claims in an attempt to save money. After a fire, you've most likely lost some personal belongings and areas of your home are completely destroyed. The last thing you need is a homeowners' insurance company giving you a hard time regarding your claim. 

First Things First, Check Your Policy

Even if you have replacement coverage for your home you actually may only have "actual cash value" for the personal items that were lost. When you call your insurance company, your agent should notify you about this and suggest buying an endorsement so that your belongings will be covered under a replacement policy. 

Secure Your Property 

The majority of homeowners coverage policy requires you to take reasonable steps to minimize more harm on your property. In short terms, this is known as your duty to mitigate damages. These steps are fairly small and easy to do, such as covering leaking areas with plastic wrap or turning off the water if you discover a huge pipe burst. Your insurance company will most likely pay these costs when you make your claim.

File Your Claim Immediately 

Every homeowner policy will require you to report your loss as soon as possible. You will need to make a call to your agent and submit a "proof of loss claim" in which you will itemize your losses in detail and list the value of each. The longer you wait, the faller you fall down the list when it comes time for the company to send an adjuster to deal with your claim. 

Always Keep Track Of Your Living Expenses

Every homeowners policy will include a loss of use clause, which entitles you to adequate reimbursement for living expenses while you're out of your home. Keep in mind, these expenses only include additional living expenses, meaning the difference between what it costs you to live on a daily basis and what it is costing you now. For example, if you ate the majority of your meals at home and your groceries cost you $400 a week and now, after a fire, you're eating out and spending $500 a week, you can claim only that additional $100. 

Fire Season

5/15/2014 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Season Wild fire threatens home

As summer approaches we find ourselves facing "Fire Season". Dry weather combined with record-breaking heat has made CA prime territory for wildfire. Dead and dry vegetation combined with high winds creates a hazardous environment where fires are common. If you have any fire damage to your home, call SERVPRO to come and restore your property. Our technicians are equipped with specially designed tools and chemicals to remove soot particles from any materials in your home or business. Remember, the fire doesn't have to happen inside your building in order for you to be effected by smoke damage. Outside fires can cause smoke to enter and damage your walls, furniture, air ducts, etc.

Things a home fire inspector may review

9/11/2013 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Fullerton Placentia is concerned with the safety of our customers. Here are some things a home fire inspector may review.



  • A proper ground. “One thing a home fire inspector should check is to make sure your home is grounded,” says Bill Burke, division manager of electrical engineering for the National Fire Protection Association. Grounding diverts excess current that may result from an electrical surge and helps to keep electrical systems, devices and humans safer.

  • Electrical panel. “There should be air space around the main panel,” Burke says. Inside, there shouldn’t be evidence of overheating or corrosion, and the fuses and breakers should be the correct size.

  • Appliances. “If you have a device that’s going to cause a home fire, it’s most likely going to be one that draws a lot of current,” Burke says. Inspectors might check the integrity of cords and plug-ins on fridges, stoves and other large appliances.

  • Out-of-date equipment. A home fire inspector can suggest improvements to reduce the risk of an electrical fire. One important update would be to install arc-fault circuit interrupters, which are designed to detect fire-starting arcs and shut down power.

  • General safety concerns. The inspector also should look for electrical hazards such as receptacles and switches that aren’t functioning properly, lightbulbs exceeding the maximum wattage, damaged cords and overloaded power strips.